Difficult staff member

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Difficult staff member

Postby SisterG » Sun Aug 19, 2007 1:56 pm

Hello there, I am new here and new to any kind of forum so please bear with me. I have recently been promoted at work and am now a junior manager, my field is nursing. I have a real problem with one member of staff who seems to be incorrigable.

Her behaviour is to my mind terrible. As far as I am concerned she should not be in the job. She ignores the clients, sits reading for hours, or is on the phone making personal phone calls, or sits on the internet. This has been going on it seems for ever, she upsets all of the other staff. Now I am in a position to try to tackle her, but how to go about it? My seniors know about it, but seem reluctant to tackle her as she can be pretty aggressive. All I know is that her behaviour is unacceptable, she is supposed to be a professional.

In order to tackle this I would have to go through a lengthy procedure, grievance etc, and it would make working with her even more uncomfortable.

I am disappointed with my seniors, if they have not tackled her, then as a junior I dont feel that I would get the support if I do do anything. Has anyone come across this and what did they do about it? Your replies will be helpful. thanks
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Postby lidopig » Sun Aug 19, 2007 5:38 pm

Hello SisterG !
I know exactly what you're going through.I assume you work for the NHS,so I advise you in the first instance to discuss the problem with your line manager and HR before tackling the staff member in question (saves all that agression unsupported) Tell them that you intend to take action (detailing all the problems) and ask for their advice and support. Don't tackle this Nurse without advice first.From what you say it doesn't sound as if a "quiet word in her ear" is going to help,but she has the right to know that her behaviour is unacceptable and to be given the opportunity to improve before any action is taken.Good luck!
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Postby SisterG » Mon Aug 20, 2007 1:54 pm

Dear Nigel, Thanks for your reply, which I have found helpful. You are right about having a "word in her ear" not working, as I have tried that!. I shall approach my line managers and HR for support and advice with this problem. Will let you know the outcomes. Thanks again.
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