Moving out and Food money

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Moving out and Food money

Postby Millenia » Wed Feb 03, 2010 6:27 pm

Hey guys,

Well i got my own place and im moving out very soon and im just wondering if any ones has any money saver tips for me?
My rent's about £250 then bills are about £100-120 with council tax. so say £350 a month for rent then i have round about £20-£30 on food.
Thing is the nearest proper food supermarket is a Morrison's and there no website, not even there own that tells you what deals they have on, plus im worried i'll overspend on my food budget as well...i like good food as in fresh food and healthy food i never eat ready made meals or anything.
I also need to save up for some furniture as the place is unfurnished so i have my bed a couple of clothes storage and that's it!
I also have this constant fear that i'll get a huge bill in and i'll put myself into debt.

Help! :oops:
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Re: Moving out and Food money

Postby Bel Bel » Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:24 pm

Deals change constantly so it's best to go in the store and check them out each week
Eating fresh food should be cheaper than buying ready meals
If £20-£30 includes your toiletries and cleaning stuff then you will probably need to try and make the most of the deals
With stuff like kitchen roll, foil, j cloths etc but there cheapest stuff. Tesco has value range but i'm not sure of morrisons eqivelant.
Get all your bills on direct debit so you pay the same each month, you can do this with gas, electric, pone, tv, council tax.
Also get your tv, broadband and phone package as one as it saves money. If you not getting sky then virgin do great deals.
Whenever you buy a place now you get a water meter fitted automatically so try and be careful not to run taps unnecessarily and don't have giant baths. If you renting check if you on a meter or not.
Fill in shoppers surveys saying you go to tesco and you usually get sainsburys or morrisons vouchers sent to you about a month later.
Morrison used to do a reward card if they still do get it and use it when you buy petrol too. The points soon add up.
Have you allowed for spending money, birthday presents etc? I save a small amount each month for xmas and it really helps come xmas.
Also try to put a bit aside for emergencies like you car breaking down etc
comparethemarket.ocm is good for price compariosn for bills, insurnace etc
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Re: Moving out and Food money

Postby pinkroses » Sun Feb 28, 2010 11:12 pm

I have found the best way to save money is to look around places to compare prices, some areas have local markets where you can buy fresh fruit and vegetables and they can work out a lot cheaper than in the supermarkets. Also what I tend to do with fresh meat is to buy a larger pack which tends to work out cheaper in the long run, cut it in to portions as soon as I get home and put the portions in freezer bags and put them in the freezer, I take them out on the day that I am going to use them to defrost, that way i'm not having to throw anything away.

I'm not sure about Morrisons, but I know with Tesco,there is a clubcard, you can collect points and they will send you money off vouchers every 3 months.

I think the direct debit idea is really good, as already mentioned is a good idea. Also I have found that some people I know find it easier to have gas and electric pay as you go meters put in, so that they always know just how much they are spending out.
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Re: Moving out and Food money

Postby Skarlet » Sun Feb 28, 2010 11:39 pm

Hey millenia, you can also shop around, poundshops are really good for cheaper toiletries like shampoos and face wipes. As well as tinfoil and other more essential items.

For furniture, look on places like your local freecycle or local ads. I got my sofas free, and they were in good condition. Getting hold of them can be difficult, but I arranged a man withvan,who was cheap to get it to my flat. Good luck with it all.
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